Archive for January, 2013

Hp Pavillion M6 (Quad Core AMD A8)

4

Specs AMD A8 processor, 8 gb DDR3 SD RAM, 2gbs dedicated graphics memory, dual switchable amd radeon graphics cards (7640 and 7670), beats audio, 6 hour battery life, roughly 5 lbs, 2 ghz, screen res
Video Rating: 4 / 5


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New iPod Nano – How to charge iPod Nano through Apple power adapter

3

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Stroller built for two

0

Stroller built for two
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
Waiting to cross Amsterdam Avenue at 72nd Street, I noticed this woman pushing a stroller. It seems to be fairly common these days that older children ride in an upright position, standing at the back of the stroller…

Note: this photo was published in a May 24, 2011 blog titled "Nanny Risks Life to Save Toddler’s Life From Drunk Driver."

**********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Can you figure out which button to push?
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at the northwest corner of Theodore Roosevelt Park, which adjoins the Museum of Natural History, on Central Park West between 78th and 81st streets. I entered this little park at Columbus and 81st Street, in hopes of finding some interesting people and things to photograph…

On another bench, these two women were focused very intently on a small digital camera, as if having trouble figuring out how to make it work…

**********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Halloween is coming
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
This picture was taken at Barzini’s fresh vegetable stand, on the west side of Broadway, between 85th and 86th Street. It was only the first day of October when I took the picture, so it seems a little premature to be celebrating Halloween; it’s hard to imagine, for example, that these pumpkins would still be firm and plump after being carved up and sitting on someone’s porch for a full month…

**********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


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Sager NP9150 (670M) vs. Sager NP9150 (7970M) – XOTIC PC Review

25

NEW! – XOTIC PC – Graphics Card Side by Side Comparison & Analysis! At XOTIC PC, we’re always looking for new ways to give you a new perspective on the latest laptops and their components. In this video we really wanted to highlight and compare the new AMD Radeon HD 7970M graphics card, and compare it to the stock graphics card on the very popular Sager NP9150. This review features: -BIOs comparisons of each laptop -3DMark Vantage benchmark comparisons -Graphics analysis and side by side comparisons -Battlefield 3 live game play on each graphics card Sager NP9150 – NVIDIA GTX 670M + Ivy Bridge i7-3610QM —vs— Sager NP9150 – AMD 7970M + Ivy Bridge i7-3920XM Extreme More Information at: www.xoticpc.com // 1-877-289-9684 // sales@xoticpc.com Configure your own Sager NP9150: www.xoticpc.com
Video Rating: 4 / 5


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Haulin’ the dog

0

Haulin’ the dog
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken in Verdi Square, outside the 72nd Street subway entrance. Lots of people were busily hurring in and out of the station; but this guy not only had a suitcase and a briefcase, but he also had a "dog snuggly", with a small Yorkie peering out to see where they were going…

********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Cooling off
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken in the pocket-park located at 77th Street, on the east side of Amsterdam Avenue. The park occupies about a quarter of a square block, between 77th and 78th Street — with swings, slides, and a couple of fountains. At this time of year, the fountains are very popular, as you can tell from this picture…

********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, homeless people, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

See, I put my hand on my hip like this so the girls will all think I’m sexy
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
Note: this photo was published in an Oct 29, 2009 blog titled "Helmet laws: Nice idea but how well do they work?"

**************************************

This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Buy Cheap Laptop Batteries at LaptopBatteryLife.com

iPhone 3GS – How to start or stop stopwatch with voiceover

0

Showhow2 is world s easiest self support platform. It makes complex technologies easy to understand and products simple to use. Now Everything is Easy!! To Watch More Easy Tutorial videos Subscribe to: www.youtube.com Connect with SHOWHOW2 Explore: www.showhow2.com Follow us on : twitter.com


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Buy Durable Laptop Batteries at LaptopBatteryLife.com

ARMA 2 OA: ACE 2 Artillery Demonstration

24

A short video demonstrating the use of Artillery in ARMA 2 OA using the ACE artillery. It involves original call for fire up to destruction of the target. Apologies for the bad spelling. As requested the units placed in the editor are as follows: The Gun – ACE Arty Howitzers / ACE M119 [US Army] The HMMV – Ace Arty Equipment / Battery Computer HMMV [US Army] The Ammo Boxes – Ace Ammunition (Arty) / 105mm Ammo M1 HE w/Fuze M782


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I won’t let you out, unless you take one of my parking flyers

6

I won’t let you out, unless you take one of my parking flyers
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
Along with her male partners up on 79th and 86th street, this young woman was teamed up with another woman at both entrances to the subway station at Verdi Square. I’m pretty sure I photographed her elsewhere in this album; see this picture for details.

********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Won’t someone *please* take my flyer?
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This young woman was standing at the southern entrance to the 72nd Street subway entrance in Verdi Square, obviously teamed up with her female companion — who was covering the northern entrance. She seemed far less interested in her job, waving her parking flyer rather listlessly as she listened to something on her iPod…

********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Untangling the dogs
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at the northern end of Verdi Square, where this elderly gentleman was doing his best to untangle the leashes of four different dogs that he had been walking. He finally had to lift one of them up, while the other three dogs did their best to ignore the whole thing…

**********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Buy Cheap Laptop Batteries at LaptopBatteryLife.com

Dell Latitude D420

25

Neeraj Srivastava shows off the latest in the Dell Latitude corporate notebook family – the Latitude D420 – and how it measures up in portability, reliability, peformance and connectivity to its big brothers, the D620 and D820.
Video Rating: 4 / 5


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Buy Durable Laptop Batteries at LaptopBatteryLife.com

MacBook Pro Memory Install

25

Learn how to add memory (RAM) to a Apple MacBook Pro notebook computer. Upgrading your MacBook Pro laptop memory is easy to do and an inexpensive way to improve the performance of your MacBook. This video will answer the question, How do I add memory to my MacBook Pro laptop computer? By showing you the simple steps to install new RAM or upgrade your existing computer for improved performance. EDGE Tech Corp is a leading supplier of memory upgrades for Apple Mac computers. For additional information on how to install memory, or help finding memory for your MacBook Pro please visit www.edgetechcorp.com/memory/apple-macbook-pro-memory.asp There you will find technical support information and links to find 100% compatible memory upgrades for any MacBook Pro.


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