Archive for February, 2013

Dell Inspiron Take Apart / Disassembly To Replace Power Plug / DC Jack

21

In this video I replace the DC Jack or Power Plug (Power Port) of a Dell Inspiron 6000. I disassemble the entire laptop to remove the Motherboard and desolder the old DC Jack and solder a new DC Jack directly to the Motherboard. Table of contents: New DC Jack 0:13 Removal of: Battery 0:24 Memory 1:00 Modem 1:09 CDRom 1:22 Hard Drive HDD 1:28 Power Button Assembly 1:33 Keyboard 1:41 Display Assembly 2:10 Laptop Case 3:01 Wireless Lan WLAN 3:27 CPU Heat Sink Cooler 4:13 GPU Heat Sink Cooler 4:40 Video Board Card 4:53 Motherboard Removal 5:44 Soldering 5:58Reassembly 6:00 If you are having problems with your computer I can help! Please send me a message or check out www.FastVideoTech.com If you plan on working on your laptop, please take notes and take your time. This video makes things look very easy. Some connectors will fall apart easier than they will disconnect and can take several minutes to slowly work apart. It is VERY easy to break small components that are expensive to replace. Depending on your individual skill level you may have more of a chance of breaking something than fixing something so if your laptop is important to you, please let an experienced technician handle it. I have over 10 years experience working with computers. I will try my best to answer questions but please keep them related to the video and the work being done. Thank you for watching! Please subscribe. www.FastVideoTech.com
Video Rating: 4 / 5


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Another day at Starbucks

2

Another day at Starbucks
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
This is the Starbucks establishment on Broadway, between 94th & 95th Street. I took a picture of it yesterday, too, with the same reflected scene of buildings across the street, on the east side of Broadway (in fact, you can see the reflected awning of the Key West Diner & Cafe).

There’s nothing particularly striking or unusual about this scene; but I’m always intrigued to see a slightly different set of characters in there, each in his own world, each sipping coffee or munching on a snack while texting or chatting on a cell-phone, or working on a computer…

Note: this photo was published in a May 31, 2009 blog titled "Zesty foodbites van deze week." And it was used to help illustrate a June 2009 Boorah blog titled "Amsterdam Cafe, New York – 79%." And it was used to illustrate an Aug 2009 Boorah blog titled "Starbuck’s Coffee – New York." More recently, it was published in a Sep 2, 2009 Consumerist blog titled "AT&T To Offer Free Wi-Fi Hotspot Access To Windows Mobile Users." It was also published in a Jun 28, 2010 blog titled Is "The Times’ Paywall Already Bad News?" And it was published in a Jul 6, 2010 blog titled "What Does Distribution Really Mean for Self-Publishers? It was also published in an Aug 17, 2010 blog titled "20 Facts About The World of College Freshmen."

Moving into 2011, the photo was published in an Apr 25, 2011 blog titled "???????????? ?." It was also published in a May 2, 2011 blog titled "Clueless Starbucks Customers Get Robbed All the Time."

Moving into 2012, the photo was published in a May 21, 2012 blog titled "5 Brands With Great Mobile Marketing Apps." It was also published in a Nov 1, 2012 blog titled "Starbucks to trial wireless tabletop charging over holiday season."

**********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

McGuyvering my phone
Computer Battery

Image by Scott M
As soon as I arrived in Europe, my cell phone decided that it wasn’t going to charge anymore. I bought a European charger specifically for the phone, but it refused to work. Then I tried buying a charger while in Germany and it still wouldn’t charge. Then I tried connecting it to a USB cable to computers at the local internet cafe. Finally, I got desperate and hacked up one fo the usb cables, jury-rigged some rechargable batteries and tried to charge the phone that way. The phone recognized that there was voltage connected, but it still refused to charge. Eventually, it *was* the phone and I got it replaced. I think that had the phone not actually been broken, this would have worked.


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Dell Inspiron 15R Special Edition

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Dell Inspiron 15R Special Edition

Take a look at our video review of the Dell Inspiron 15R Special Edition a chunky hunk of laptop containing a bunch of powerful innards.


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Embedded Electronics Starter Kit andrino 032

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Embedded Electronics Starter Kit andrino 032
Computer Battery

Image by Michael Kappel
The Arduino Uno is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328

It has 14 digital input/output pins (of which 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable or power it with a AC-to-DC adapter or battery to get started.

arduino.cc/en/Main/arduinoBoardUno

Photo taken by Michael Kappel of my Embedded Electronics Experiment Kit
View the high resolution Image on my picture website
Pictures.MichaelKappel.com

Arduino Uno R2
Computer Battery

Image by Michael Kappel
The Arduino Uno is a microcontroller board based on the ATmega328

It has 14 digital input/output pins (of which 6 can be used as PWM outputs), 6 analog inputs, a 16 MHz crystal oscillator, a USB connection, a power jack, an ICSP header, and a reset button. It contains everything needed to support the microcontroller; simply connect it to a computer with a USB cable or power it with a AC-to-DC adapter or battery to get started.

arduino.cc/en/Main/arduinoBoardUno

Photo taken by Michael Kappel of my Embedded Electronics Experiment Kit
View the high resolution Image on my picture website
Pictures.MichaelKappel.com


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Maglite XL50 LED Flashlight

24

Sensible Survival Presents: The Mag-Lite XL50 LED Flashlight. Great Tactical design with a push button switch on the tail and a machined Aluminum Body, The XL50 uses 3 AAA Batteries. It will last up to 36 hours on the low setting and 8 hrs and 45 mins on High. Made in America and priced under . Thanks for watching~ Sootch00


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Buy a Durable Laptop Battery at LaptopBatteryLife.com

Achievement unlocked: played Tetris on the side of a skyscraper — the Green Building at MIT (video)

0

Achievement unlocked: played Tetris on the side of a skyscraper — the Green Building at MIT (video)
Laptop Battery

Image by Chris Devers
I wasn’t involved in this, but when I read about it, I drove over to see for myself.

On the southwest(ish) corner of McDermott Court, close to Building 14 / Hayden Memorial Library, they had a black console set up where anyone that walked up could take a turn playing it. The console was about the size of a washing machine or large podium, with the four standard Tetris ? ? ? ? directional buttons, and that was about it.

The game was very responsive. Aside from the fact that the “screen” was almost 300′ tall, the gameplay wasn’t all that different from playing it on an ordinary computer, video game console, smartphone, Game Boy, etc. The main problem was the pixel glitches — some windows were left on, and others weren’t lighting up, so you couldn’t always tell what shape the tiles were until they had moved a couple of levels.

Notably, the console was on a concrete plaza, and there were no wires connected to it. So it had wireless access to the network (not so surprising), and a stable power supply (slightly more surprising). Chances are it was probably just a laptop that started out with a fully-charged battery, and ran until the battery expired.

[That, or the console was over a manhole cover, and there was a Mechanical Turk under it controlling everything, but I think we can dismiss that explanation.]

• • • • •

Quoting from MIT’s Hacks site:

Tetris on the Green Building

• Location: Green Building (Building 54)
• Date: Evening of April 20, 2012.

Hackers turned MIT’s Green Building into a giant, playable, and multi-color Tetris game. A console allowed players to move, rotate, and drop blocks.

The Green Building (Building 54) is home to the MIT Earth and Planetary Sciences department.

MIT hackers have long considered "Tetris on the Green Building" to be the Holy Grail of hacks, as the side of the building is a wonderful grid for the game.

The game started off scrolling the words "TETRIS" and then would start into the first level. As the player progressed, the second level would start with more pale colors, making it harder to identify the type of block. The third level involved the colors shifting on-screen. Upon losing the game, all of the blocks would fall to the bottom of the building.

Additional Information and Photo Credits

More:

• Universal Hub: www.universalhub.com/2012/giant-tetris-mit
• MSNBC: www.ingame.msnbc.msn.com/technology/gadgetbox/students-pl…
• Hack-a-Day: hackaday.com/2012/04/23/mit-students-take-tetris-to-a-gra…
• Mashable: mashable.com/2012/04/23/tetris-building/
• Laughing Squid: laughingsquid.com/tetris-building-hack-at-mit/

Same hack in 2006: www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmKgLp6L55c


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*.*NETBOOK REVIEW*.* HP Mini NetBook review

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*.*NETBOOK REVIEW*.* HP Mini NetBook review

www.youtube.com Please Rate and Comment Thank you, The HP Mini Net Book has a lot of good features for the price you can’t beat it any were. Here are a few key points to look out for when buying the HP mini net book. A netbook you can take everywhere to stay connected; up to 9.5 hours of battery life (no internal optical drive) Genuine Windows XP Home with Service Pack 3 Intel(R) Atom(TM) N455 (1.66GHz) + Intel(R) Graphics Media Accelerator 3150 [For Mobile Broadband] 1GB DDR2 System Memory (1 Dimm) 160GB 5400RPM SATA Hard Drive Up to 9.5 hours of battery life (6 cell) Web cam, with Integrated Digital Microphone
Video Rating: 4 / 5


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Samsung Notebook RV511 Review

5

www.amazon.com Samsung Notebook RV511 Review. I bought this at best buy 6 months before this review for 9. I am pretty happy with it. In this video I give some of the pros and cons of the Samsung RV511 laptop.
Video Rating: 5 / 5


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Man and his dog

2

Man and his dog
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
Note: this photo was published in an Oct 6, 2011 blog titled Missing Persons, with the same caption and detailed notes I had written on this Flickr page.

*******************************

This man was sitting on a park bench on the median strip between the uptown and downtown lanes of Broadway, on Broadway and 90th St., enjoying a quiet moment with his poodle.

For a street-photography class that I’m taking in March 2009, I’m trying three things that are a significant change from my usual approach: first, I’m processing all images in black/white ("if a picture isn’t good in B/W, it probably isn’t good in color, either" says one of my instructors). Second, I’m trying to zoom in on the faces and head of the people that I’m photographing, rather than trying to emphasize their posture, their body language, or their interactions with other people. And third, I’m trying to find some interesting things other than people to photograph — with emphasis on "interesting." We’ll see how it goes this week…

****************************
This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

A member of the invisible generation
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
This elderly woman had been standing near a trash receptable that was nearly as tall as she was, as I approached from behind her, on the southwest corner of 86th and Broadway. This whole section of Broadway was in dark shadow, because there was a construction "overpass" to protect pedestrians from random debris associated with renovation work taking place on the building above. I wasn’t sure if a picture taken in the shadows would turn out, so I decided to take this picture from the northern side of 86th Street — where I had the advantage of more sunlight…

The contrast between the previous picture and this one is striking enough; but I also realized in this picture that I was looking at members of two entirely different generations. I had not even seen the young blonde woman in the background, as I walked past her and focused on the older woman. And I’d be willing to bet that she didn’t see me, nor did she see the older woman, as she chatted and flirted with the two young men on the right side of the picture…

**********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

From the back…
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
I noticed the gymnastics-like pose this woman was making while I was still half a block away, approaching the southeastern corner of Broadway & 86th Street. I think that’s her husband standing next to her, but he didn’t seem to be paying any attention to her.

Anyway, I thought that while it was an interesting pose, in terms of the lines and angles, it was also rather boring: you can’t tell whether the woman is old or young, beautiful or ugly, etc.

Normally, there wouldn’t be anything I could do about such a situation, because the woman would walk away or change her pose, by the time I got up to her. But this woman was standing stock-still apparently chattering away on her cell phone …. so I thought: maybe if I just walk 10-20 feet past her, turn around, and snap another picture, I’ll get a different perspective. And that is exactly what I did, in the next picture…

This picture was published in a Sep 4, 2008 blog article entitled "Walking the walk: gait infers sexual history."

**********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Buy a Durable Laptop Battery at LaptopBatteryLife.com

How to Lengthen the Life of Your IBM ThinkPad Laptop Battery

0

How to Lengthen the Life of Your IBM ThinkPad Laptop Battery

IBM ThinkPad laptop computer owners love the fact that their notebooks give them the freedom of movement while they are using them. However, it is frustrating when you may be on a plane or in a car and you have nowhere to plug in your charger. The freedom of having a laptop suddenly ends when you have no power.

The only way you have of getting that freedom back is to charge it when you are able to get to an outlet. On the other hand, if you could just improve the life of your notebook battery this problem will not come around too often. Here are several ways to make sure you do not run your battery down sooner than you have to.

Put your screen settings on low.

Most laptop computers have the ability for you to dim the screen. Some notebooks will even let you change CPU and cooling system properties. If you can, put all of features things on their lowest settings.

Add another RAM stick or two if possible.

Having more RAM will allow you to process more on your computer without using virtual memory. Virtual memory will result in the use of your hard drive and can be much less power efficient. Adding ram will also take more energy, so whenever possible, try not to run programs that need a lot of RAM.

Defrag your computer often.

If your hard drive can do what it needs to quickly there will be less demand on it and therefore less demand on your battery. The best way to make sure you hard drive is working as quickly as it can is to defrag regularly and make sure that while you are defragging that your computer is plugged in.

Shutdown all programs that are running in the background.

To run at maximum efficiency you should make sure that you are not running any background programs like iTunes, windows media player or messenger. Try not to run anything that is not absolutely crucial to the project at hand.

Try not to use your CD or DVD player whenever possible.

Running a disk will take more power. You should try to work off your hard drive instead of putting in a program. However, we all know that many programs will not run without a disk, therefore this cannot be avoided sometimes.

Do not always run your laptop while it is plugged in.

You should exercise your battery by running only on it at least once every couple of weeks. Also, if you have a newer computer with a newer type battery you should never let it go completely dead, doing this is best for older batteries that have memory problems.

Use the hibernate option instead of the stand by option when the computer is not in use.

By putting your computer on standby you will still be losing battery but in hibernate mode the computer will save its current state and shut down.

These are just a few of the many power saving tips available for your IBM ThinkPad laptop computer. You can search online and find many more that are just as great as the ones that are listed above. We all know that some people cannot use all of the power saving tips but they can do some. Every little bit helps when trying to save your battery power for as long as possible.

For great deals and selection on IBM ThinkPad Laptop Batteries please visit: Cheap New & Used IBM ThinkPad Laptops For Sale

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kent_Lee


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