School boys
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was on the west side of Broadway, between 88th and 87th; from 1998 to 2006, I lived in an apartment building on the other side of Broadway in this block.

Anyway, I was intrigued by these five young men ambling up the street — four of whom wer wearing white shirts and ties, which you rarely see (at least on young male adults) in New York City. They didn’t have blazers or sport-coats or jackets, and their outfit would normally not be considered a school uniform … but what else could it be?

The other thing that intrigued me is that the closest school to this location, as I recall, is a public high school on Columbus and 85th St — i.e., two blocks south, and two long blocks to the east.

Well, who knows … maybe they were tourists, dressed this way because they thought that’s how all New Yorkers dress. Ha!

Note: this photo was published in an Aug 4, 2010 blog titled "School Uniforms Generate Hot Debates in the Last Days." It was also published in a Dec 12, 2012 blog titled "After Spending 0K On Law School, Recent Grads May Become Bloggers."

**********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

BostonSMCPhotoWalk 28
Computer Batteries

Image by matt.searles
Apparently Todd has this whole system for broadcasting, or narrow casting.. our GPS chrominance so folks who might be running late might be able to catch up… only trouble is.. that it had the side effect of draining the battery… thus the conversation about UX design and Mobile / the unteathering / physical computer / future of technology…

Contradiction in terms
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
"21st Century Pre-war Residences"? Huh? Say what?

The term "pre-war," when used to describe an apartment building in Manhattan, generally means a building that was constructed in the 1920′s or 1930′s (i.e., before World War II). As compared to new buildings (like this one, perhaps!), pre-war buildings generally had extremely thick walls and floors, so residents were effectively sound-proofed against the racket they would otherwise hear from their upstairs, downstairs, and next-door neighbors.

However, if a pre-war building was constructed in, say, 1925, that would mean that the plumbing and electrical wiring was 75 years old if you moved in around the middle of this decade. Rewiring and re-plumbing of such apartments can be a really expensive nuisance…

Note: this picture was published in the Oct 3, 2008 issue of the on-line version of The New York Observer, in an article entitled "Condo Sales, That Great Manhattan Barometer, Plunge From ’07." It was also published in the previous day’s issue of the same blog, in an article entitled "What To Watch For in Latest Manhattan Housing Reports."

**********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Learn about Laptop Battery Life at LaptopBatteryLife.com