Relaxing in the shade
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This man was relaxing in the shade, outside the entrance to Georgia’s Cafe (see this picture for details), on Broadway and 89th Street.

Note: this photo was used to help illustrate a June 2009 Boorah blog titled "Amsterdam Cafe, New York – 79%." It was also published in a Jul 28, 2009 blog titled "The Four Day Work Week." And it was published in a Nov 8, 2011 blog titled "How can I show you how much I love you if you don’t let me?"

Note: after the photo got published the second time in Jul 2009, I decided to do some editing (using techniques I simply didn’t know about when I first took the photo in 2008). I adjusted the hot spots and cold spots, decreased the extent of shadows on the man’s face, decreased the exposure by about 1/4 of an f-stop to eliminate the glare of the white truck in the background, and saturated the color of the table and chairs somewhat. It might not make that much of a difference to anyone, but I feel better about it now…

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This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Day camp
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at 74th Street & Amsterdam Avenue, as I walked north.

This is a common scene in NYC at this time of year: young kids attend day-camp, usually right outside Manhattan, but sometimes in Manhattan; and when it’s over, they are picked up by either a parent or a babysitter.

I didn’t know that’s what I was dealing with when I decided to take this picture. My attention was first drawn to the little boy with the sunglasses; then it struck me that he and his sister (I assume) made a symmetrical pair, and that they were nicely set off by their mother (I assume) in the middle. I have no idea if there really is a baby (as I presume there is) in the stroller.

Oh, by the way: if you zoom in on the t-shirts, you’ll see that these kids apparently attend the "JCC" camp in Manhattan, which is located at Amsterdam and 76th St.

Note: this photo was published in a Jun 23, 2009 blog titled "Stroller travel system: stroller safety standards." It was also published in a May 21, 2012 blog titled "Top 4 Tips for Traveling With Kids." And it was published in a Jul 26, 2012 blog titled "Day Camp."

********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, homeless people, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

And then she said … and then I said … and then …
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
These two women were standing at the southwest corner of 83rd & Broadway when I photographed them. It’s a common scene in Manhattan, especially on the Upper West Side: two elderly women, standing close together on a street corner (where they often block the path of other pedestrians, and younger women with strollers and carriages), kibitzing for long periods of time about the local gossip in their lives.

Note: this photo was published in a Nov 17, 2008 blog titled "I Beg to Disagree." It was also published in a Dec 16, 2009 blog titled "Nokia device of the decade."

Moving into 2010, the photo was published in a Mar 16, 2010 blog titled "Assertiveness training tips." And it was published in a Jun 28, 2010 blog titled "Cool Conversation Tips images." It was also published in a "5 Minute Bible" blog titled "E100-80: Acts 25:1 – 28:31: Ending in Rome?"

Moving into 2011, the photo was published in a Jul 8, 2011 blog titled "Just don’t call me late for dinner."

********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, homeless people, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


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