Posts tagged BB35

Battleship Texas (BB35)

18

Battleship Texas (BB35)
Computer Batteries

Image by The Rocketeer
In 1948, the Battleship TEXAS became the first battleship memorial museum in the U.S. That same year, on the anniversary of Texas Independence, the Texas was presented to the State of Texas and commissioned as the flagship of the Texas Navy.

The TEXAS is the last of the battleships, patterned after HMS Dreadnought, that participated in World War (WW) I and II. She was launched on May 18, 1912 from Newport News, Virginia. When the USS TEXAS was commissioned on March 12,1914, she was the most powerful weapon in the world, the most complex product of an industrial nation just beginning to become a force in global events.

In 1916, TEXAS became the first U.S. battleship to mount antiaircraft guns and the first to control gunfire with directors and range-keepers, analog forerunners of today’s computers. In 1919, TEXAS became the first U.S. battleship to launch an aircraft.

In 1925, the TEXAS underwent major modifications. She was converted to oil-fired boilers, tripod masts and a single stack were added to the main deck, and the 5" guns that bristled from her sides were reduced in number and moved to the main deck to minimize problems with heavy weather and high seas. Blisters were also added as protection against torpedo attack.

The TEXAS received the first commercial radar in the US Navy in 1939. New antiaircraft batteries, fire control and communication equipment allowed the ship to remain an aging but powerful unit in the US naval fleet. In 1940, Texas was designated flagship of US Atlantic Fleet. The First Marine Division was founded aboard the TEXAS early in 1941. April 21, 1948 the Texas was decommissioned.


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Battleship Texas (BB35)

6

Battleship Texas (BB35)
Computer Batteries

Image by The Rocketeer
In 1948, the Battleship TEXAS became the first battleship memorial museum in the U.S. That same year, on the anniversary of Texas Independence, the Texas was presented to the State of Texas and commissioned as the flagship of the Texas Navy.

The TEXAS is the last of the battleships, patterned after HMS Dreadnought, that participated in World War (WW) I and II. She was launched on May 18, 1912 from Newport News, Virginia. When the USS TEXAS was commissioned on March 12,1914, she was the most powerful weapon in the world, the most complex product of an industrial nation just beginning to become a force in global events.

In 1916, TEXAS became the first U.S. battleship to mount antiaircraft guns and the first to control gunfire with directors and range-keepers, analog forerunners of today’s computers. In 1919, TEXAS became the first U.S. battleship to launch an aircraft.

In 1925, the TEXAS underwent major modifications. She was converted to oil-fired boilers, tripod masts and a single stack were added to the main deck, and the 5" guns that bristled from her sides were reduced in number and moved to the main deck to minimize problems with heavy weather and high seas. Blisters were also added as protection against torpedo attack.

The TEXAS received the first commercial radar in the US Navy in 1939. New antiaircraft batteries, fire control and communication equipment allowed the ship to remain an aging but powerful unit in the US naval fleet. In 1940, Texas was designated flagship of US Atlantic Fleet. The First Marine Division was founded aboard the TEXAS early in 1941. April 21, 1948 the Texas was decommissioned.

Guy with cane
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This guy was walking from the Broadway side of 72nd Street to the Amsterdam Avenue side, right past the entrance to the 72nd Street subway station. He was giving me a slightly quizzical look, as if to say, "What kind of nut would want to take a picture of me?"

Note: this photo was published in an undated (late Oct 2010) blog titled "Helping You Ease Arthritis Pain." It was also published in an undated (Dec 2010) "Neck Arthritis" blog, with the same title and detailed notes that I had written on this Flickr page.

It was also published in a Jan 7, 2011 blog titled "Where can I find cura-heat liquid for arthritis pain relief?" And it was published in an undated (mid-Feb 2011) arthritis blog, with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written on this Flickr page. It was also published in an undated (late Mar 2011) blog titled "Make Everyday Tasks Easier With Aids for Arthritis." And it was published in an Apr 4, 2011 blog titled "http://www.pronexcervicaltractiondevice.com/how-does-your-doctor-treat-your-fibromyalgia-i-get-little-to-no-relief-headachesneckjawfacial-pain/" It was also published in a May 15, 2011 blog titled "treatment for fibromyalgia pain?" And it was published in a May 28, 2011 blog titled "Does Natural Arthritis Relief Really Work?" It was also published in an Aug 18, 2011 Alternative Pain Relief blog, with the same caption and detailed notes that I had written on this Flickr page. And it was published in a Nov 14, 2011 blog titled "Q&A: Rheumatoid arthritis at age 36?"

Moving into 2012, the photo was published in a Jan 1, 2012 blog titled "Q&A: What age did you get rheumatoid arthritis?" It was also published in an undated (early Jan 2012) blog titled "Muscle Relaxant and Pain Relief," and a Jan 8, 2012 blog titled "Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment." And it was published in a Jan 16,2012 blog titled "Rheumatoid Arthritis in Men Leads to Erectile Dysfunction."

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This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

regret. nothing.
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was part of a billboard advertising a dietetic brand of potato chips, which I saw on the street, somewhere around Broadway & 75th Street. I thought it was an interesting sign on its own…

Note: this photo was published in a June 14, 2009 blog titled (duh!) "No regrets!" And a tightly cropped version of the photo was published in an Apr 19, 2010 blog titled "Success." It was also published in a Jun 29, 2010 blog titled "Have you ever regretted that you initiated a rematch?" And it was published in a Jul 23, 2010 blog titled "Regrets, I Have a… No, Wait, I Don’t Regret a Thing." It was also published in an Aug 5, 2010 Norwegian blog titled "Hvorfor er det ingen som angrer?", and an Aug 9, 2010 Vancouver Sun blog titled "What parents regret most about having children."

Moving into 2011, the photo was published in a Jan 12, 2011 blog titled "Top 5 regrets." It was also published in a Feb 24, 2011 blog titled "Any regrets in your life?" And it was published in a Mar 21, 2011 blog titled "Getting Over Regrets." It was also published in a Jul 7, 2011 blog titled "Have a Deep Regret About Work? You Must be a Man." And it was published in a Jul 23, 2011 blog titled "Living With Regret Isn’t Living." And it was published in an Oct 17, 2011 blog titled "Schöne No Privacy Bilder." It was also published in a Dec 21, 2011 blog titled "Incite 12/21/2011: Regret. Nothing."

Moving into 2012, the photo was published in a Nov 23, 2012 blog titled "Regrets? I have only one."

************************

This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


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