Posts tagged don’t

We don’t even realize that total strangers are listening to our intimate conversations

4

We don’t even realize that total strangers are listening to our intimate conversations
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This woman was babbling away on one of the "Broadway Malls" benches, between the east side and west side of Broadway, at approximately 92nd Street. The word "train" on her blue t-shirt indicates that she’s one of the trainers at the Equinox gym, on the west (right) side of the street behind her…

*********************************

This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

It’s called “Twitter,” Mom…
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
I don’t actually know if the young boy is explaining Twitter to his mother here; more likely, it was an email or IM text message. But the great thing about pictures like this is that you can imagine whatever you want about the interactions between people that you’ve never seen before, and will probably never see again…

***************************

This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Buy Cheap Laptop Batteries at LaptopBatteryLife.com

No, I don’t need any help – I’m doing just fine on my own…

4

No, I don’t need any help – I’m doing just fine on my own…
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
Those of us who live in the neighborhood often see this man, navigating along the street with his cane. It’s a natural instinct to offer assistance when he’s crossing the street, and he tends to be fairly short-tempered and grouchy when he turns us down. But indeed, he does seem to be doing just fine on his own…

****************************

This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Bundled up
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at the north end of Verdi Park, on what I thought was a relatively mild mid-day Monday in February; the temperature was in the mid-40s, and most people (including me) were wearing somewhat lighter jackets than what we had been forced to wear throughout most of January. But not this woman: she was obviously still very, very cold…

***************************

This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Buy a Durable Laptop Battery at LaptopBatteryLife.com

Don’t stop the music

0

Don’t stop the music
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
These two women were photographed on Broadway at 90th Street. The man behind them was pushing a stroller, which you basically can’t see; he had nothing to do with the women, as far as I could tell…

********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Learn about Laptop Battery Life at LaptopBatteryLife.com

Don’t bother me: I’m thinking deep thoughts. It looks even more impressive when you hold a cellphone while you think…

16

Don’t bother me: I’m thinking deep thoughts. It looks even more impressive when you hold a cellphone while you think…
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This guy was sitting at an outdoor cafe called ‘Arte Around the Corner" at 73rd Street and Columbus Ave in Manhattan.

Note: this photo was used to help illustrate a June 2009 Boorah blog titled "Amsterdam Cafe, New York – 79%."

Moving into 2012, the photo was published in an undated (early Jan 2012) blog titled "Amsterdam Cafe, New York."

*********************************

This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Buy Cheap Laptop Batteries at LaptopBatteryLife.com

don’t stop, make it pop.//DEMI|MILEY|SELENA//tiktok_(PREVIEW) *description edited

25

okay i am SO MAD. you don’t know how MUCH trouble i had uploading this. i uploaded this, and then youtube said uploading failed. and i re-tried 2 more times (each about 15mins) but still cannot. then i had to re-render in sonyvegas to avi format and that took kinda long then to upload it took 1hr+ but my laptop ran out of battery and hibernated so i had to re-upoad it(1hr+) and then the settings(including description box) couldn’t save. i re-typed it so many times but still cannot D’: ugh. i am so angry with youtube uhh. cause of one punctuation mark they said couldn’t put in description. so now i’m re-typing it without that. okay. i took FOREVER to do this video, (like 15secs-5hrs :o ) but i kinda had fun :D i wana do the whole thing, but i don’t know how long it’ll take. if you want me to do so, COMMENT kayys :D if you don’t, you still have to(: {^from the video uploaded on my backup account^} when i uploaded this(this account), they said uploading failed!! but then a few days later the video WAS uploaded! wth. so i didn’t do the description and all.
Video Rating: 4 / 5


UNBEATABLE 50% OFF DISCOUNT! Buy Replacement Laptop Battery on www.LaptopBatteryLife.com

Don’t buy a Dell, Power Adapter Issue

25

DON’T BUY ANY DELL/ALIENWARE LAPTOPS Apparently related to a very thin wire in the middle of the power cable leading to the laptop. If this breaks (happened twice now) your laptop will enter performance saving mode, the battery won’t charge (leaving your laptop useless) and it will run so slow that it will be unusable (leaving your laptop even more useless)


UNBEATABLE 50% OFF DISCOUNT! Buy Replacement Laptop Battery on www.LaptopBatteryLife.com

Why don’t You Buy this Discount Replacement Laptop Battery for Dell LATITUDE D630 Now

0

Why don’t You Buy this Discount Replacement Laptop Battery for Dell LATITUDE D630 Now

Replacement Laptop Battery for Dell LATITUDE D630

Product ID: NDE048 Battery Type:Li-ion Color: Metallic Grey Capacity: 2200mAh Volt: 14.80V Weight: 235.00g Dimension: 185.10×66.45×19.10mm

 

Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery Tips

We focus on bringing the best replacement Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery sales to our customers and desire our customers can buy their satisfying Dell Laptop Battery, the Li-ion 2200mAh 14.80V Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery on sales will be the perfect replacement to your original Dell LATITUDE D630 machine.

We guarantee the Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery with a full one-year warranty from the date of purchase, 30-days money back, if the battery(s) have any quality problem! If you have any question or suggestion about this LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery, please Contact Us so we can offer you the most convenient service.

Descriptions of the Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery

Special designed replacement (suitable) for Dell LATITUDE D630  Manufactured by Hi-Capacity power Laptop batteries products. We accept credit card payment through Wordplay or Paypal payment systems when you buy Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery. We also accept Personal Check, Money Order and Bank Transfer on Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery. Final price of this Laptop batteries Dell LATITUDE D630 including GST – Australia Only 100% Safe Shopping Guaranteed with Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery. There are great selections of Laptop batteries, camcorder battery, digital camera battery, battery charger, power tools battery, PDA battery, AA/AAA battery, laptop AC/DC adapter and other accessories etc on our site. If you are not satisfied with  Laptop batteries Dell LATITUDE D630 for any reason, please don’t hesitate to contact us, we will reply you within 24 hours. Usuallys your Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery Shipped within 24 Hours On Mon-Fri.

 

  Use Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery need pay attention to some matters:

Carefulnessly read narrate book of battery, use commendatory battery. Research whether the electric appliance and the Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery contact elements is whether clean, when necessity clean with the wet cloth mop, after dry loads according to the correct polar direction. When non-adult custody, don’t let the child replace the battery, compact battery like AAA should be placed at somewhere the child can’t attain. Don’t mix up new and old batteries or put different model batteries together. Don’t try to make Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery rebirth use of hotting up, charging,or other way. Don’t let battery short circuit. Don’t hot up Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery or loss it in water. Don’t strip battery. Electro-adapter should be cut switch after use. Dell LATITUDE D630 Laptop Battery shoud be take off from adapter when it is long time no use . Battery should be stocked in cool and dry places.

Welcome to ebattery.com.au

Some laptop components, such as laptop batteries, AC adapters and battery chargers, can be found in usual offline stores, but at a higher price. You can save your time and money buying components for your laptop on our site – up to 30-35% savings on a new laptop battery and other items!

We offer low prices on laptop batteries and adapters for major brands such as Dell, Acer, Toshiba, Compaq, SONY, Apple, IBM, HP etc., and a wide range of other quality batteries – Power Tool batteries, Digital Camera batteries, Camcorder batteries, Mobile Phone batteries and more products.

When shopping on ebattery.com.au, you get great customer service, a 30 Days’ Satisfaction Guarantee and 12 Months Warranty.
http://www.ebattery.com.au


Article from articlesbase.com


UNBEATABLE 50% OFF DISCOUNT! Buy Laptop Battery on www.LaptopBatteryLife.com

Go to Top