Posts tagged Last

How to Save iPhone 5 Battery Life: Make your Battery Last Longer on a Single Charge! (HD)

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How to Save iPhone 5 Battery Life: Make your Battery Last Longer on a Single Charge! (HD)

Enjoy the video? Subscribe! http://bit.ly/169uIZL ??? Follow for Exclusive Cydia Updates: https://twitter.com/TheCydiaUpdate How to Save iPhone 5 Battery…
Video Rating: 4 / 5


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Tutorial: 9 ways to make your Laptop Battery life last Longer – Windows 7 Episode 2 Season 4

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The following information has been taken from http://mintywhite.com/windows-7/10-ways-improve-laptops-battery-life/ 10 Ways to Save Battery Power Here’s 10 w…
Video Rating: 3 / 5


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How long will the batteries last in the FreeMotion power console system

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How long will the batteries last in the FreeMotion power console system? How do I change the backlight settings to maximize battery life? For corresponding p…
Video Rating: 0 / 5


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Can This Chip Really Make Laptop Batteries Last 50 Percent Longer?

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Intel is expected to launch the new chipset at the Computextrade show in next month.
Video Rating: 5 / 5


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How to Make a Laptop Battery Last Longer

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http://www.thetechmaster.org http://www.twitter.com/jhales2000 https://www.facebook.com/#!/thetechm http://jhales2000scybertips.blogspot.co.uk/ http://www.yo…
Video Rating: 0 / 5


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I just wish days like this could last forever…

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I just wish days like this could last forever…
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
Note: this photo was used to illustrate a June 2009 Squidoo blog titled "Father’s Day Trivia and Answers."

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This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Four girls in boots
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
Note: this photo was published as part of an illustration for a Jul 2009 Squidoo blog titled "Sunglasses for Summer."

*****************************
This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


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Editing at Last Minute

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Editing at Last Minute
Laptop Battery

Image by JcOlivera.com
I was about to leave for my next assigment, when I got a call and client needed some photos right away, my laptop battery was low so I plugged an adapter I have for my car and in minutes I was sending those files.

This is how I work when I’m on deadlines!

Sent on the Now Network? from my Sprint® BlackBerry

Hard At Work
Laptop Battery

Image by LexnGer
Gerry actually worked the entire way down to the cottage. Gotta love those long life laptop batteries!


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Laptop Repair & Maintenance : How to Make Your Laptop Battery Last

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A laptop battery’s life can be lengthened through a number of steps, such as dimming the screen or slowing down the processor. Discover why laptop batteries need to be discharged at times with help from a laptop repair specialist in this free video on laptop computer batteries. Expert: Nathan Morgan Contact: www.parts-people.com/ Bio: Nathan Morgan is the founder and CEO of Parts-People. Filmmaker: Chip Hoyt


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Mobile Computing: Make Notebook Batteries Last

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Mobile Computing: Make Notebook Batteries Last

More than ten tips for getting more from a battery.

Feature: Boosting Your Notebook’s Battery

Nothing’s worse than having piles of work to finish on an airline flight–and your notebook battery starts to die. Okay, so maybe a dead car battery that leaves you stranded in a steep gulch as flood waters rapidly engulf you is a little worse. But not much.

With some tweaking here and there, you can keep your notebook battery running longer. Read on for details…

Configure Your Notebook’s Power Settings

Your notebook’s display and hard drive are its two biggest battery hogs. But you can control them by using a Windows XP Control Panel utility called Power Options. (Earlier versions of Windows offer similar power-saving options in the Control Panel, too.)

Go to the Start menu, click Control Panel, and then open Power Options. On the Power Schemes tab, select Portable/Laptop from the top drop-down menu. In the “Settings for” area, you can tell your notebook to act differently depending on the power source. For example, you can set the hard disk to never turn off when the computer is plugged into an AC adapter and to stop spinning after 3 minutes when on battery power. However, I recommend that you not allow hibernation to kick in too early, because notebooks take a minute or so to come out of that state.

After fiddling with the settings, you can save them to the Portable/Laptop scheme or as a new scheme: Click the Save As button, leave “Portable/Laptop” or enter a new name, and click OK.

Use Stand By and Hibernate Appropriately

Windows XP provides two battery-saving sleep modes for your computer: Stand By, which is kind of like snoozing; and Hibernate, which is deep, rapid-eye-movement-style slumber (with snoring provided by the man next to you in coach).

In Stand By mode, your display and hard drive are shut down and all open applications and files are stored in RAM. This allows your notebook to wake up quickly, but a low level of power is required to maintain this somnambular state. Bottom line: Use Stand By for brief intervals when you won’t need the computer–you’re stretching your legs on a long flight, for instance.

With Hibernate, everything is powered down and the contents of RAM are stored on your hard drive. Hibernate mode uses less power than Stand By, but takes a bit longer to resume. Bottom line: Hibernate is the ticket when you won’t be using your computer for a while–you’re changing planes at the airport, say–but you want to resume work faster than you could after a complete system shutdown.

When you choose Start, Turn Off Computer in Windows XP, your options are Stand By, Turn Off, and Restart. To Hibernate, place the cursor over Stand By, then hold down Shift and click.

Stick to the Essentials

Turn off scheduled tasks.

Windows XP lets you easily prevent scheduled and automated tasks (which can consume battery power) from occurring when you’re running on batteries. Here’s how to set that up: Select Start, All Programs, Accessories, System Tools, and then Scheduled Tasks. Right-click a scheduled task in the list (such as Norton AntiVirus) and click Properties. Select the Settings tab. Under Power Management, click to chose the following: “Don’t start the task if the computer is running on batteries” and “Stop the task if battery mode begins.” Click OK to save your changes.

Adjust your display.

Dimming your display can save battery power. Most notebooks today include keyboard keys for adjusting brightness and contrast.

Turn off or unplug nonessential devices.

PC Card modems, external USB devices, and so on can drain power even when idle.

Shut down wireless networking unless you need it.

A wireless network PC Card or built-in chip set can drain power, too.

Don’t play music on your notebook.

Listening to a music CD or digital music files on your notebook is another battery drain. Instead, pack a portable MP3 or CD player in your carry-on; better to drain its batteries than your notebook’s.

Don’t play DVDs, either. Watching a DVD movie is one of the biggest battery-sucking activities. You could pack a portable DVD player instead, but they’re expensive–some go for nearly 00–and it’s yet one more thing to pack.

Consider Some Purchases

Look into a notebook alternative.

PDAs can run on batteries far longer than the typical notebook can. So instead of packing your notebook, consider a Pocket PC equipped with a landline or wireless modem and an external keyboard, for example. Sure, the PDA screen is much smaller than a notebook’s, and PDA applications are more limited. But you can keep typing hours after your seatmate’s ThinkPad has expired.

Another option is AlphaSmart’s Dana (0), a Palm OS-based full-size keyboard with an LCD, which can run for up to 25 hours on a single charge. And when its rechargeable battery runs out, you can pop in three AAA batteries and keep going.

Get a notebook with long-lasting batteries.

If you’re in the market for a new notebook, put long battery life high on your list of features. Notebooks based on Intel’s new Pentium M, especially those implementing the full Centrino architecture (which includes the Pentium M along with Intel’s 855 chip set and the company’s 802.11b, or Wi-Fi, hardware), are among the best in terms of battery performance. For example, Toshiba’s Centrino-based Tecra M1 lasted 7 hours, 6 minutes–longer than any other notebook we’ve tested. You can shop for the latest Tecra prices (beginning around 00) at the PCWorld.com Product Finder.

Replace your notebook’s battery regularly.

You should swap in a new battery about every 18 months. Most notebooks today use lithium-ion batteries, which don’t have the memory-loss problems of older notebook batteries. Still, even rechargeable lithium-ion batteries lose their ability to hold a charge over time. Shop for the latest prices on your notebook battery at our Product Finder by typing in your notebook’s name or model number into the search field.


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Make Your Laptop Battery Last Longer

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Laptop Battery
by cote

Make Your Laptop Battery Last Longer

I never give the battery in my laptop much thought. I charge it when I need to and forget about it. That changed a couple of weeks ago when I couldn’t get to the Web at home, and was reduced to working at an Internet cafĂ©. Since there’s lots of competition for seats with power outlets here in blogger-heavy San Francisco, I made sure my laptop was charged before I left the house. HP laptop batteries

Ten minutes of use and my PC shut down. It was out of power. I charged it again, same thing happened. Yes, the battery was DOA. Humble as a battery may be, you won’t get much work done without a good one. ibm laptop battery

After shelling out for a new one, I asked around and found a battery expert who has some solid tips on how to give laptop batteries a long and energy-rich life.

1. Keep the Laptop Off Your Lap

“Batteries like to be at room temperature, and I don’t mean like a room in the tropics,” says John Wozniak, a distinguished technologist for Hewlett-Packard. battery for sony laptop

Although most of us call our portable PCs laptops, today’s high-performance notebooks aren’t designed to sit on your lap. Sure, they get warm and you may start to feel uncomfortable after a while, but that’s not the point. Most laptops have little legs on the bottom, designed to let a bit of air flow underneath. When you’re working on a hard surface, like a desk, there’s no problem, but when the notebook sits on your lap, it sinks down a bit and air can’t circulate.

That can become a real issue rather quickly if you’re watching a movie, since playing a DVD keeps both the CPU and the graphics chips busy and running fairly warm. You can avoid the problem by working on the folding tray if you’re flying, or spending or so on a pad stiff enough to give the laptop a bit of clearance.

Keeping the vents on your laptop clean does a lot to keep heat from building up. A simple, but effective method is to buy a can of compressed air from any computer shop or hardware store and blow out the dust.

2. A Little Unplugging Helps

Not so long ago, most laptop batteries were NiCads, that is, nickel cadmium based. That design had a fairly major flaw: if the battery was consistently charged before running most of the way down, it would no longer take a full charge, no matter how long it was plugged in. That was called battery memory, and the solution was to drain them every now and then and be sure they got a full charge.

Today’s lithium ion batteries don’t have that problem, so don’t worry about recharging before the power gauge is hovering near empty, says Wozniak.

However, leaving them plugged in all the time isn’t a good idea either, although it’s tempting. In effect, the battery gives the user an uninterruptible power supply, so if you expect the electricity to go off unexpectedly, it makes sense to keep the battery in place when the machine is plugged in.

But do that too much, and your battery will degrade. So remove it if you don’t plan to work unplugged for an extended period of time. The best way to store a lithium ion battery is to let it drop to about 60 percent of its charge and be sure you keep it in a reasonably cool place, he says.

3. Understand the Specs

What’s Needed for Cloud Computing: Download now

Remember, battery technology doesn’t follow Moore’s Law. Having covered the technology industry for quite a while now, I’ve heard many promises that a real breakthrough in battery technology was coming. Well, it hasn’t–and Wozniak says he doesn’t see one on the horizon.

That’s not to say batteries haven’t improved; they have, with gains of about 6 percent to 8 percent per year, he adds.

Generally speaking, more cells per battery mean more power, but that doesn’t mean a 12-cell battery will give you 33 percent more running time than a nine-call battery. For example, a 9-cell battery rated 3.0 amp hours has just about the same energy as a 12-cell battery rated at 2.2 amp hours.

Rather than do the math, it’s simpler to check the specs and compare the number of watts, an easier number to find. As you’d guess, the actual run time a battery will yield is dependant on what the notebook is doing. Applications like video use a lot more juice than writing or surfing the Web, of course.

No electronics product will last forever, but treated well, your battery hang in there for at least two or three years.


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