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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: main hall panorama

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: main hall panorama
Computer Batteries

Image by Chris Devers

See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | _details_pending_:

Why? I’ll tell you why:sometimes I have one of those “senior moments,” and I can’t remember where I live. So I just get in a taxi, point to my shirt, and say, “Take me there!”
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
(more details later, as time permits)

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This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Photomontage of main entrance view, including P-40 Warhawk & F-4 Corsair up front, SR-71 Background below in the near distance, and the Space Shuttle Enterprise beyond

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Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center: Photomontage of main entrance view, including P-40 Warhawk & F-4 Corsair up front, SR-71 Background below in the near distance, and the Space Shuttle Enterprise beyond
Computer Batteries

Image by Chris Devers
Blogged on ? HoloChromaCinePhotoRamaScope? as: Bye bye, Miss American Pie.

• • • • •

Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Curtiss P-40E Warhawk (Kittyhawk IA):

Whether known as the Warhawk, Tomahawk, or Kittyhawk, the Curtiss P-40 proved to be a successful, versatile fighter during the first half of World War II. The shark-mouthed Tomahawks that Gen. Claire Chennault’s "Flying Tigers" flew in China against the Japanese remain among the most popular airplanes of the war. P-40E pilot Lt. Boyd D. Wagner became the first American ace of World War II when he shot down six Japanese aircraft in the Philippines in mid-December 1941.

Curtiss-Wright built this airplane as Model 87-A3 and delivered it to Canada as a Kittyhawk I in 1941. It served until 1946 in No. 111 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force. U.S. Air Force personnel at Andrews Air Force Base restored it in 1975 to represent an aircraft of the 75th Fighter Squadron, 23rd Fighter Group, 14th Air Force.

Donated by the Exchange Club in Memory of Kellis Forbes.

Manufacturer:
Curtiss Aircraft Company

Date:
1939

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 330 x 970cm, 2686kg, 1140cm (10ft 9 15/16in. x 31ft 9 7/8in., 5921.6lb., 37ft 4 13/16in.)

Materials:
All-metal, semi-monocoque

Physical Description:
Single engine, single seat, fighter aircraft.

• • • • •

Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird:

No reconnaissance aircraft in history has operated globally in more hostile airspace or with such complete impunity than the SR-71, the world’s fastest jet-propelled aircraft. The Blackbird’s performance and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments during the Cold War.

This Blackbird accrued about 2,800 hours of flight time during 24 years of active service with the U.S. Air Force. On its last flight, March 6, 1990, Lt. Col. Ed Yielding and Lt. Col. Joseph Vida set a speed record by flying from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., in 1 hour, 4 minutes, and 20 seconds, averaging 3,418 kilometers (2,124 miles) per hour. At the flight’s conclusion, they landed at Washington-Dulles International Airport and turned the airplane over to the Smithsonian.

Transferred from the United States Air Force.

Manufacturer:
Lockheed Aircraft Corporation

Designer:
Clarence L. "Kelly" Johnson

Date:
1964

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 55ft 7in. x 107ft 5in., 169998.5lb. (5.638m x 16.942m x 32.741m, 77110.8kg)
Other: 18ft 5 15/16in. x 107ft 5in. x 55ft 7in. (5.638m x 32.741m x 16.942m)

Materials:
Titanium

Physical Description:
Twin-engine, two-seat, supersonic strategic reconnaissance aircraft; airframe constructed largley of titanium and its alloys; vertical tail fins are constructed of a composite (laminated plastic-type material) to reduce radar cross-section; Pratt and Whitney J58 (JT11D-20B) turbojet engines feature large inlet shock cones.

• • • • •

Quoting Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Vought F4U-1D Corsair :

By V-J Day, September 2, 1945, Corsair pilots had amassed an 11:1 kill ratio against enemy aircraft. The aircraft’s distinctive inverted gull-wing design allowed ground clearance for the huge, three-bladed Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propeller, which spanned more than 4 meters (13 feet). The Pratt and Whitney R-2800 radial engine and Hydromatic propeller was the largest and one of the most powerful engine-propeller combinations ever flown on a fighter aircraft.

Charles Lindbergh flew bombing missions in a Corsair with Marine Air Group 31 against Japanese strongholds in the Pacific in 1944. This airplane is painted in the colors and markings of the Corsair Sun Setter, a Marine close-support fighter assigned to the USS Essex in July 1944.

Transferred from the United States Navy.

Manufacturer:
Vought Aircraft Company

Date:
1940

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 460 x 1020cm, 4037kg, 1250cm (15ft 1 1/8in. x 33ft 5 9/16in., 8900lb., 41ft 1/8in.)

Materials:
All metal with fabric-covered wings behind the main spar.

Physical Description:
R-2800 radial air-cooled engine with 1,850 horsepower, turned a three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propeller with solid aluminum blades spanning 13 feet 1 inch; wing bent gull-shaped on both sides of the fuselage.

• • • • •

See more photos of this, and the Wikipedia article.

Details, quoting from Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum | Space Shuttle Enterprise:

Manufacturer:
Rockwell International Corporation

Country of Origin:
United States of America

Dimensions:
Overall: 57 ft. tall x 122 ft. long x 78 ft. wing span, 150,000 lb.
(1737.36 x 3718.57 x 2377.44cm, 68039.6kg)

Materials:
Aluminum airframe and body with some fiberglass features; payload bay doors are graphite epoxy composite; thermal tiles are simulated (polyurethane foam) except for test samples of actual tiles and thermal blankets.

The first Space Shuttle orbiter, "Enterprise," is a full-scale test vehicle used for flights in the atmosphere and tests on the ground; it is not equipped for spaceflight. Although the airframe and flight control elements are like those of the Shuttles flown in space, this vehicle has no propulsion system and only simulated thermal tiles because these features were not needed for atmospheric and ground tests. "Enterprise" was rolled out at Rockwell International’s assembly facility in Palmdale, California, in 1976. In 1977, it entered service for a nine-month-long approach-and-landing test flight program. Thereafter it was used for vibration tests and fit checks at NASA centers, and it also appeared in the 1983 Paris Air Show and the 1984 World’s Fair in New Orleans. In 1985, NASA transferred "Enterprise" to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum.

Transferred from National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Automatic NERF EBF-25 Turret
Computer Batteries

Image by Randomskk
I rigged a NERF Vulcan/Havok Fire EBF-25 up so that its firing could be controlled by computer, then used the motion detecting software ‘motion’ for linux to have the gun fire when it detects the door opening.

The gun itself has three chained ammo belts, for a total of 74 shots, and a 12.6V lipo battery instead of the 9V D-cell battery pack it would use stock. The firing mechanism is an Arduino driving a servo connected to some pencils to pull the trigger, and there’s a Logitech C300 webcam on the gun to source video. The laptop itself also plays sound files from Portal turrets when motion is detected or stops being detected. Check out www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrWUhVeEcHk for video!

Automatic NERF EBF-25 Turret
Computer Batteries

Image by Randomskk
I rigged a NERF Vulcan/Havok Fire EBF-25 up so that its firing could be controlled by computer, then used the motion detecting software ‘motion’ for linux to have the gun fire when it detects the door opening.

The gun itself has three chained ammo belts, for a total of 74 shots, and a 12.6V lipo battery instead of the 9V D-cell battery pack it would use stock. The firing mechanism is an Arduino driving a servo connected to some pencils to pull the trigger, and there’s a Logitech C300 webcam on the gun to source video. The laptop itself also plays sound files from Portal turrets when motion is detected or stops being detected. Check out www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrWUhVeEcHk for video!


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The main menu

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The main menu
Laptop Battery

Image by Mageos89
The main menu

Experiencing Technical Difficulties
Laptop Battery

Image by The Doctr
Sorry everybody. Looks like I’ll be out for a little while due to technical difficulties. Let me list all the problems Ive had just in the past month:

1. Laptop power cable caught fire. I was on call at the hospital, in my call room and smelled smoke. I looked around and same my PowerBook’s cable sparking & smoking. Yeah. I haven’t gotten a replacement yet.

2. My iPod battery stopped holding a charge. Not gradually like they normally do, but all of a sudden. I waiting for a refurb’d one to come in the mail.

3. My in ear headphones that I use on stage and for my iPod broke. I go thru those every couple years, guess time was up.

4. I dropped my phone and cracked the screen. Luckily, the SD card slot stopped working as well, so insurance covered it. And they didn’t have any more XV6800′s, so they gave me an HTC Touch Pro instead for my deductible. Not bad for an upgrade.

5. And the newest and most annoying: my desktop (a PC) has decided it’s either a) not going to boot or b) if it does boot, it’ll shut itself down about 5 min later. Since that’s where I’ve been doing all my photo stuff, I’m kinda screwed until it’s fixed. I was going to get a new computer this summer, I might move that up since my desktop is about 6yrs old now.

Anyway, I’m still taking photos. I’ll see you guys when I see ya. I’ll still be on Facebook (since I can access from my phone), so if you need your Doctr fix, find me there.


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