Shopping for yummy plums…
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at the Broadway Farms’ fresh-fruit/vegetable stand at Broadway & 85th Street, on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It’s a common scene: an elderly man shopping alone, dressed in an outfit that suggests — but doesn’t guarantee — an orthodox Jewish faith. He seemed to be selecing a couple of so-called "yummy plums," but showed no interest in the persimmons, or the watermelons to his left…

Note: this photo was published in an Oct 12, 2009 blog titled "The Future of Food Shopping." It was also published in a Jan 25, 2010 blog titled "Latitude 42: Food, Connected." And it was published in a May 4, 2010 blog titled "Food Innovation Study: Can Technology Help Groceries Build Community?"

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This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Volunteering for Children’s International
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at Broadway and 94th Street, which turns out to be relatively close to the neighborhood New York Sports outlet. At first, I thought these girls were either trainers, sales reps, or employees of some sort from NY Sports Club; but when I walked past them, I noticed that their t-shirts and shoulder-bags said "Children’s International". So I assume they were doing volunteer work for that organization.

In the background is the "Symphony Space" concert hall…

Note: this photo was published as an illustration for an Aug 2009 blog titled "International Volunteer Organizations," at www-dot-mahalo-dot-com-slash-international-volunteer-organizations It was also published as an illustration in a Sep 2009 blog titled "How Mahalo Works," at www-dot-mahalo-dot-com-slash-how-mahalo-works. It was also published in a Dec 7, 2012 blog titled "17 Things That All New Yorkers Fear."

***********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, homeless people, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Reading the paper
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
This woman was sitting alone on a bench in a small "pocket park" called "Straus Park", on the western side of Broadway, just below 107th Street. I think she was reading the paper, but it also appears that she is holding a pen — as if to fill in a crossword puzzle, or perhaps mark some available jobs or apartments in the classified section of the paper. And it also looks like the friendly logo of the "Colonel" — i.e., from KFC — is staring at us from her cup of soda. Why would anyone buy soda from a KFC outlet?

Note: this photo was published in an undated (Sep 2010) blog titled "Nice Buy Apartment Manhattan Photos." It was also published in a Jun 9, 2011 blog titled "The ‘train’."

**********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


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