Posts tagged Tell

Hey Mom, you know that guy I said I was bringing home for dinner? Well, I forgot to tell you that sometimes he dresses a little … ummm … oddly.

1

Hey Mom, you know that guy I said I was bringing home for dinner? Well, I forgot to tell you that sometimes he dresses a little … ummm … oddly.
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
(more details to come, as time permits)

*****************************

This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

I know they dress funny, Mama, but this isn’t Mumbai…
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
(more details to follow, as time permits)

***********************************

This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Buy a Durable Laptop Battery at LaptopBatteryLife.com

Laptop Repair & Maintenance : How to Tell if a Laptop Battery Is Bad

15

Laptop Repair & Maintenance : How to Tell if a Laptop Battery Is Bad

In order to tell if a laptop battery is bad, look at the power meter under Power Options to see if an unplugged computer loses more than one percent of its charge per minute. Find out how to use a light meter to test the battery on newer laptops with help from a laptop repair specialist in this free video on bad laptop computer batteries. Expert: Nathan Morgan Contact: www.parts-people.com/ Bio: Nathan Morgan is the founder and CEO of Parts-People. Filmmaker: Chip Hoyt
Video Rating: 2 / 5


UNBEATABLE 66% OFF DISCOUNT! Buy Cheap Laptop Batteries on www.LaptopBatteryLife.com

Tell You Prolong the Life of Your Laptop Battery

0
Laptop Battery
by FHKE

Tell You Prolong the Life of Your Laptop Battery

Initialize a new Laptop battery. New laptop batteries should be fully charged before their first use to obtain maximum capacity. Nickel-based batteries should be charged for 16 hours initially and run through 2-4 full charge/full discharge cycles, while lithium ion batteries should be charged for about 5-6 hours. Ignore the phone telling you that the battery is full–this is normal but is not accurate if the battery is not initialized. #DO NOT fully discharge a lithium-ion battery! Unlike Ni-Cd batteries, lithium-ion laptop batteries’ life is shortened every time you fully discharge them. Instead, charge them when the battery meter shows one bar left. Lithium-ion batteries, like most rechargeable batteries have a set amount of chargers in them.

Keep the Laptop battery cool. Your laptop battery will last longest if used near room temperature, and nothing wears on a battery like extended exposure to high temperatures. While you can’t control the weather, you can avoid leaving your laptop in a hot car or in direct sunlight. In addition, check the Laptop battery while it’s charging. If it seems excessively hot, your charger may be malfunctioning.

Charge your Laptop battery correctly, in accordance with its type. Most newer laptop have lithium-ion batteries, while older ones generally have nickel-based batteries. Read the label on the back of the battery or in the technical specifications in the manual to determine which yours is.

Nickel-based batteries (either NiCd or NiMH) DO NOT generally suffer from a misunderstood phenomenon known as the “memory effect.” The term “memory effect” has been widely mythologized to describe any and all deterioration of NiCd (and other battery chemistries), in many cases misleading consumers into further shortening the lives of the batteries through over-discharging to “recondition” them. [This section formerly read: If you charge the battery partially enough times, eventually the battery “forgets” that it can charge fully. A nickel-based battery suffering from memory effect can be reconditioned, which requires the battery to be completely discharged, then completely recharged (sometimes several times). The appropriate length of time between reconditionings varies. A good rule to follow for nickel-battery cell-phones is to discharge them completely once every two to three weeks, and only when you have a charger available. Lithium ion batteries can be preserved by careful charging and avoiding storing them at full charge.They do not require “reconditioning.” Regardless of the battery type, use only a charger rated for your battery, and discontinue use of a charger that causes the battery to heat up excessively.

Store Laptop batteries properly. If your battery will be out of use for a while, disconnect it from the laptop and store it in a cool place (the refrigerator is good, but freezing temperatures do not slow oxidation) and away from metal objects. Ensure that the battery is not exposed to moisture; try putting the battery in an airtight container or bag. Lithium ion batteries are not rated to operate at refrigerated temperatures, so let the laptop battery sit outside the refrigerator for at least an hour before using it again. Lithium ion laptop batteries oxidize least when they are stored at 40% charge. Never store a lithium battery at low voltage. Recharge batteries after storage.

Clean the laptop battery contacts on the battery and on the laptop. Over time, contacts may accumulate dirt. Clean them with a cotton swab and rubbing alcohol to maximize the efficiency of energy transfer. In addition, if the contacts are two different metals, such as gold and tin, accelerated corrosion known as “fretting” occurs. Cutting the corrosion from fretted contacts often requires solvents, such as acetone or nail polish remover. Be careful: these solvent dissolve plastic, so use a Q-Tip to avoid damaging the battery housing or the laptop.

Discount Laptop Batteries: ASUS A42-M6 Laptop Battery ASUS A41-A6 Laptop Battery


UNBEATABLE 50% OFF DISCOUNT! Buy Replacement Laptop Battery on www.LaptopBatteryLife.com

Go to Top