Posts tagged Think

Okay … so if I want people to think I’m all grown up, I’m gonna have to get some boots like those…

3

Okay … so if I want people to think I’m all grown up, I’m gonna have to get some boots like those…
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on Broadway, between 88th and 89th Street.

Note: for some reason, this photo was published as an illustration in a Sep 2009 Squidoo blog titled "Honda Scooters."

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This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Sitting alone in the cold
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
Walking back home at the end of the afternoon, I saw this man sitting alone on the cold stone benches that stretch along the middle of Verdi Square. He seemed lost in thought, and didn’t notice me when I snapped his picture.

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This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


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Mom, I think I’m old enough to walk to school on my own now …

3

Mom, I think I’m old enough to walk to school on my own now …
Computer Battery

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken in Verdi Square…

****************************

This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


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Don’t bother me: I’m thinking deep thoughts. It looks even more impressive when you hold a cellphone while you think…

16

Don’t bother me: I’m thinking deep thoughts. It looks even more impressive when you hold a cellphone while you think…
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This guy was sitting at an outdoor cafe called ‘Arte Around the Corner" at 73rd Street and Columbus Ave in Manhattan.

Note: this photo was used to help illustrate a June 2009 Boorah blog titled "Amsterdam Cafe, New York – 79%."

Moving into 2012, the photo was published in an undated (early Jan 2012) blog titled "Amsterdam Cafe, New York."

*********************************

This is the continuation of a photo-project that I began in the summer of 2008: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

As I indicated when I started this project in 2008, I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

Thus far, I’ve generally avoided photographing bums, drunks, crazies, and homeless people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, far more people who are not so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


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I think I might not need all of this stuff

1

I think I might not need all of this stuff
Computer Battery

Image by stu_spivack
I bought a battery charger so that I wouldn’t have to worry about my cell phone battery dying. It’s huge overkill for just a cell phone but it will also rescue my netbook and camera. Of course, it means that I basically pack the standard charge and then the separate connectors for each gadget that I packed.

Wrist Computer Concept Question
Computer Battery

Image by Brick Farmer
Those of you who have read Kim Stanley Robinson’s Mars Trilogy will know what I mean when I say wristpad.
For those who don’t, a wristpad is a wrist-worn computer formfactor.
This design consists fo a combination flexible touchscreen/battery (each exist), and a small control module containing the processors, a battery, a small camera, a laser pointer, and a few white LEDs. The display would wrap around most of the wrist, clasping on the side farthest from the control module. The computer would be ambidextrous, displaying the watch on one side fo the wrist, and other information on the other. The processor would not have to be very powerful, because only a few applications could run on such a limited screen resolution. It could, however, be used as a music player, supporting mp3, wav, aac, ogg, wma, and flac. Audible, too, probably. The device could aso serve as a bluetooth extension to a phone, or mabye have a phonen built in. Either way, it could use a cellular connection to grab and display information like stocks, weather, launch time, maybe RSS. Full-page web browsing is a definite nogo. Leave that to your lectern.
Input would be through the touchscreen and mabye the bezels around the ends of the control package. Also probably a button at the non-camera/light end of the control module, but that might be where the earbuds enter.
Hmm. Designing Human Interface Devices is hard.

What should I add to it?

Screen mock-ups to come.

Plugs and computer
Computer Battery

Image by fixedgear
Red bar-end plugs and Cateye Kosmos. I replaced the battery and re-set the computer for the new year.


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More Than What You Think Of A Laptop Battery

0

More Than What You Think Of A Laptop Battery

How laptop batteries interrelate with the computer to function properly absolutely is a lengthy process as well as manufacturing alone a laptop battery is even worst long indeed. Laptop companies are also working continuously to improve and develop such functions of laptop battery technology.

The procedures used to bring in about laptop batteries involves a system of tests and re-tests to guarantee safety and consistency. There are an amount of components besides the battery that makes it work. There are safety fuses, breakers, thermistor, and charge electronics which all aids and gives support in the functionality of laptop batteries which you can magnificently seen inside the casing. The battery pack casing is welded together in a detailed method and is then sent on for final check up. Different tests are documented for form, fit and function during final inspection. Once the battery passes the test, it is now labeled with a lot and date code.

The thermistor controls the resistance of the battery and informs the computer to stop charging when the battery heats up as it completes charging. Moreover, the circuit breaker facilitates and helps protect against danger and hazards caused by over charging and short circuits.

Laptop batteries are built with the finest quality battery components that can be found for suitability. Battery cells are ensured to yield the highest capacity and safety qualifications, whether the battery cell is NiHM, or Li-Ion. Some batteries are even equipped with their own microprocessor that communicates important charge information to the computer. Sequential knowledge about laptop batteries certainly helps you a lot for a more effective, efficient, and comfortable usage of your laptop. Now you won’t just see simple and non-refundable box-shaped thing when choosing a laptop battery, but rather a “tiny-tony” that helps your laptop to run reliably and effectively.

Absolutely laptop batteries are the most complicated and regulated of all rechargeable batteries, but one thing’s for sure, they are the most important battery in the field of rechargeable batteries!


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