Posts tagged Won’t

How To Fix A Laptop That Won’t Turn On

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This is a great way to fix a laptop that wont turn/come on. Sometime the power needs to be removed from the components. This will work unless you have a more…


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What to Do When Your Laptop Won’t Turn On

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Laptop refusing to turn on? Some basic troubleshooting for your PC is all it takes to find the cause and possibly a solution. http://dell.to/13owrrM.
Video Rating: 4 / 5


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My Laptop Battery Wont Charge

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http://www.cambridgelaptoprepair.co.uk/services/laptop-battery-not-charging-dc-jack-repair/ We repair and replace defective laptop dc power jacks to a higher…
Video Rating: 4 / 5


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My Laptop Battery Won’t Charge

1

Video Rating: 1 / 5


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I won’t let you out, unless you take one of my parking flyers

6

I won’t let you out, unless you take one of my parking flyers
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
Along with her male partners up on 79th and 86th street, this young woman was teamed up with another woman at both entrances to the subway station at Verdi Square. I’m pretty sure I photographed her elsewhere in this album; see this picture for details.

********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Won’t someone *please* take my flyer?
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This young woman was standing at the southern entrance to the 72nd Street subway entrance in Verdi Square, obviously teamed up with her female companion — who was covering the northern entrance. She seemed far less interested in her job, waving her parking flyer rather listlessly as she listened to something on her iPod…

********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.

Untangling the dogs
Computer Batteries

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at the northern end of Verdi Square, where this elderly gentleman was doing his best to untangle the leashes of four different dogs that he had been walking. He finally had to lift one of them up, while the other three dogs did their best to ignore the whole thing…

**********************

This is part of an evolving photo-project, which will probably continue throughout the summer of 2008, and perhaps beyond: a random collection of "interesting" people in a broad stretch of the Upper West Side of Manhattan — between 72nd Street and 104th Street, especially along Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue.

I don’t like to intrude on people’s privacy, so I normally use a telephoto lens in order to photograph them while they’re still 50-100 feet away from me; but that means I have to continue focusing my attention on the people and activities half a block away, rather than on what’s right in front of me.

I’ve also learned that, in many cases, the opportunities for an interesting picture are very fleeting — literally a matter of a couple of seconds, before the person(s) in question move on, turn away, or stop doing whatever was interesting. So I’ve learned to keep the camera switched on (which contradicts my traditional urge to conserve battery power), and not worry so much about zooming in for a perfectly-framed picture … after all, once the digital image is uploaded to my computer, it’s pretty trivial to crop out the parts unrelated to the main subject.

For the most part, I’ve deliberately avoided photographing bums, drunks, drunks, and crazy people. There are a few of them around, and they would certainly create some dramatic pictures; but they generally don’t want to be photographed, and I don’t want to feel like I’m taking advantage of them. I’m still looking for opportunities to take some "sympathetic" pictures of such people, which might inspire others to reach out and help them. We’ll see how it goes …

The only other thing I’ve noticed, thus far, is that while there are lots of interesting people to photograph, there are far, far, *far* more people who are *not* so interesting. They’re probably fine people, and they might even be more interesting than the ones I’ve photographed … but there was just nothing memorable about them.


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Zune 30gb fix/solution if it won’t start/boot up (not frozen)

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Zune 30gb fix/solution if it won't start/boot up (not frozen)

This is how I fixed my 30gb Zune (1st generation). It’s not a frozen Zune like other people have experienced. It’ll just restart over and over and it won’t boot up. So replace the battery. I bought a replacement battery on ebay for . Hope this helps someone. Edit: Before buying the new battery, I first tried unplugging the original battery for 1 minute and then plugging it back in, in the hope that it would reset the zune, but that didn’t work for me. These 1st generation zunes are so old that they need new batteries after many years of recharging and discharging after regular daily use. It seems that if the battery goes bad, then it won’t allow the zune to boot up.
Video Rating: 4 / 5


120%+ SUPER BATTERY LIFE! Buy Cheap Laptop Batteries at LaptopBatteryLife.com

Fix Laptop That Won’t Turn On

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this works about 50% of the time so you might as well try it before you pay someone to do it for you…. in this video i show you how to do a esd on a Compaq but it also works for dell hp emachine and any other laptop or desktop also learn hot to fix a Wii that won’t turn on www.youtube.com ///// Fix ordinateur portable qui ne s’allume pas


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Dell Inspirion Laptop Battery Won’t Charge

0
Laptop Battery
by jaaron

Dell Inspirion Laptop Battery Won’t Charge

A laptop utilizes a battery for power when it is not plugged into an electrical outlet. Dell Inspiron laptops use rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The battery has a life expectancy of 12 to 24 months, depending on several factors, such as care and battery usage. If the battery is not holding a charge, it may be damaged or dead and need to be replaced. Prior to replacing the battery, you should troubleshoot it, just to be sure. dell latitude d820 battery

Attempt to fully charge the battery. Plug the power adapter into the laptop and allow the battery to charge overnight.

Turn the Dell Insprion laptop off. Unplug the laptop from the power adapter.

Flip the laptop upside down so the battery is visible. The battery is located on the underside of the laptop.

Slide the battery lock switch and hold it in place. Lift the battery upward for removal. Once removed, release the battery lock switch.

Examine the battery. Look for signs of damage to the battery. If you notice any damage, the battery must be replaced. dell latitude d610 battery

Clean the battery contacts. Dip a cotton swab in rubbing alcohol and clean the battery contacts and the contacts inside the battery bay to remove dust.

Check the battery charge. Press the “Status” button on the back side of the battery. It has five lights that will display how charged the battery is. Five lit lights indicates a full charge, one lit light indicates a low charge and no lit lights indicates the battery has no charge. If the battery has no charge, it is dead and needs to be replaced. If the battery does indicate it is partially or fully charged, continue troubleshooting.

Recalibrate the battery. Place the battery back in the laptop. It will just pop into place. Turn the computer on and allow the computer to run on battery power until the battery dies. Once the battery dies, plug the power adapter into the computer and allow the battery to fully charge again. Remove the battery and check the battery charge. If it still has not fully charged, you need a new battery.  dell inspiron 1720 laptop battery


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When Laptop Battery Won’t Hold a Charge, how to do?

0

When Laptop Battery Won’t Hold a Charge, how to do?

Most laptop batteries have a life expectancy of two years or 400 to 450 charge and discharge cycles. After this time, the battery may lose the ability to charge or to hold a charge for substantial periods of time. When this happens, it’s likely the battery needs replacement. However, troubleshooting can narrow the problem and ensure you are not wasting money on a battery replacement. toshiba laptop battery

Check Power Adapter

1 Turn the laptop off. Remove any power cords or power sources.

2 Separate the battery from the bottom of the laptop. Slide or press the locking mechanism to unlock the battery. Slide the battery out of the battery compartment.

3 Plug the power adapter into an electrical outlet. Insert the opposite end of the adapter into the charging outlet on the side of a laptop.

4 Power on the laptop. If the laptop does not turn on, the power adapter is not correctly working. If the power adapter is not working, the battery can not charge. Replace the power adapter. If the laptop powers on, the power adapter is properly working. HP pavilion battery

Clean Battery Contacts

1 Turn the computer off. Remove any power cords or sources.

2 Take the battery out of the battery compartment.

3 Dip a cotton swab in isopropyl alcohol. Rub the dampened swab on the battery compartment and battery contacts. Dust and buildup can prevent battery contacts from properly charging.

4 Slide the battery back into the battery compartment. dell inspiron battery

Charge and Test Battery

1 Plug the power adapter into the laptop.

2 Charge the battery for six hours.

3 Remove the power adapter.

4 Turn the laptop on. If the laptop turns on and stays on for at least 30 minutes, the battery is holding a charge. If the laptop doesn’t turn on or the battery doesn’t power the laptop for at least 30 minutes, the battery should be replaced.


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